Norma McCorvey in Roe v Wade

Roe v Wade hanging by thread as SC review Mississippi abortion law – Here’s why

For about five decades, the supreme court ruling in Roe v Wade legalized abortion until fetal viability, effectively, women can have an abortion up six months of pregnancy.

The ruling has served as a judicial precedent to quash abortion laws in states such as Arkansas, Utah etc. Recently, the state of Texas, introduced the Heartbeat Abortion law, which bans abortion when a fetal heartbeat can be detected, that is beyond six weeks of pregnancy.

But it is not the Texas law that is in focus now, but a Mississippi Abortion law which bans abortion after 15weeks. The case is being reviewed by the Supreme court.

READ ALSO:  Texas abortion ban: The Texas heartbeat bill and it's implications

Why this supreme court could overturn Roe v Wade

The simple answer is, it’s a conservative majority. The supreme court is constituted by nine judges, six of whom are conservative leaning.

The court now has a 6-3 conservative super majority. All 6 conservative judges have at one time spoken against abortion, with Justice Amy Coney Barrett, the newest addition to the supreme court justices being the most outspoken of them all.

The Trump administration appointed three supreme court justices, all of who have been known to support abortion bans. The current constitution of the US supreme court could mean that, a decision could be more conservative leaning and that could overturn Roe v Wade or a decision could be reached that fundamentally alters the effect of Roe v Wade.

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Mississippi 15-week Abortion Law – Full Text

Norma McCorvey – Story of the woman in Roe v Wade

Texas abortion ban: The Texas heartbeat bill and it’s implications

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Difference between Texas Abortion law and Mississippi Abortion Law

There are two major differences between the Texas heartbeat law and the Mississippi Abortion law.

The Texas law bans abortion after six weeks, a time when fetal heartbeat can be detected while the Mississippi law bans abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

The second difference is that, the Texas Law gives power to residents of Texas to sue people who aid, abet or perform abortions of pregnancies older than 6 weeks when fetal pregnancy can be detected.

READ ALSO:  Norma McCorvey - Story of the woman in Roe v Wade

The Mississippi law on the other hand prescribe sanctions on medical officers who breach the law including license suspension and civil penalty or fines not exceeding $500 imposed by the Mississippi health department.

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