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Gross sexual imposition meaning and sentencing

Gross sexual imposition meaning ohio

Gross Sexual imposition is a serious sexual crime which doesn’t require penetration to obtain a conviction. Aside serving time in prison, a conviction can tarnish and destroy your reputation and future employment prospects.

Once an individual is accused of gross sexual imposition, even if he or she is innocent, there would the need to immediately seek the services of a criminal defense attorney as the consequences of a guilty verdict will last for a lifetime. To understand what GSI means, we must first define sexual imposition.

Sexual imposition meaning

Sexual Imposition can be described as the offensive touch of another person who isn’t the spouse of the offender, in a sexual manner. The crime of Gross Sexual Imposition is a higher version of Sexual Imposition. According to Ohio state laws, for a sexual imposition charge to be applied:

  • The accused must be 18 or older, and also have to be 4 years older than the accuser
  • The accuser must be older than 13 years, and at the same time younger than 16 years.
  • The accuser must have known, that the accused would be unable to prevent his actions.
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Gross sexual imposition definition

Gross sexual imposition is defined as the sexual contact of a person who is not the spouse of the offender in a forceful manner, under the threat of force or under circumstances where the victim is unable to give consent due intoxication or being below the age of 13.

Gross sexual imposition Meaning Ohio

In Ohio, one commits a crime of Gross Sexual Imposition if the following requirements under the Ohio Revised Code are met.

  • The victim is 13 years or younger.
  • The accused forced his way on the victim
  • The accused stopped or prevented the victim from resisting his actions.
  • The accused knew about the victim’s physical or mental situation (Such as intoxication) that hindered him/her/they from giving consent.
  • The accused came into physical contact with the victim’s genitals.

Penalty for ORC Gross sexual imposition

Ohio revised code GSI sentencing is based on the fact that GSI is classified as a first degree misdemeanor or felony of the fourth degree which carries a prison sentence of up to 18 months and a fine of up to $5000.

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In aggravated GSI offences, an offender could be charged for a third-degree felony, which carries a sentence of up to 5 years in prison.

The offender would also be required to register as a sex offender and is legally required to declare his registration status even if he/she moves from the state the crime was committed.

Defense of a GSI charge

If you think you’re being falsely accused of a GSI, it is important to know that you and your legal team can defend your case on some of the points below as you try to establish your innocence to avoid the consequences of a guilty verdict.

1. Motivation of accuser

The defense can probe the motivations of an accuser and what they stand to gain. Establishing a plausible gain the accuser stands to gain from the accusation can expose malicious intent.

2. How evidence was obtained

There are rules to how a piece of evidence can be admissible in court. A defense attorney would probe to know if the acquisition of the evidence followed due procedure. Usually, the rules ensure that evidence aren’t tainted or that the results of tests conducted and presented as evidence have sound scientific grounding.

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GSI Facts

What does GSI stand for in the criminal system?

GSI is an abbreviation for Gross Sexual Imposition. It is a crime that is punishable by up to 5 years in prison, fines and a requirement to register as a sexual offender.

Gross sexual imposition statute of limitation

According to Ohio state law, the statute of limitation for gross sexual imposition and other sex-related crimes is 20 years. This means that, a person is not allowed to bring accusations of GSI to court after 20 years.

This is to prevent misrepresentation of evidence or facts in court which could result in a miscarriage of justice.

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